Practice

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    Devereaux
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    Practice

    Post by Devereaux on Wed Dec 02, 2015 7:39 pm

    OK. So I'm a tolerably decent shooter. I go to the range relatively often. I shoot a number of different weapons, and even try to shoot faster, though not seriously.

    Last night I went out to shoot with a bunch of Marines. The course of fire was kind of a modified IPSC El Presidente. In the first round, you loaded 6 rounds, put the weapon on the table, had a second mag also with 6 rounds. The targets were 6 circles at 8 yds. The course was to double tap each circle, to include a combat reload.

    Ah, I need work. I hit each circle ONCE in the middle, but the other shot was off. Not enough not to be in a guy who was represented by the circle being center mass, but off.

    Second course was mag with 4 rounds x2, and 2 silhoutes. You double tapped each, reloaded, and then double tapped again. Better this time. Of the 8 rounds, only 1 was kind of a peripheral hit; the rest were central though not a group in the sense I think of a group.

    Some observations. I'm 69, and I was clearly the fastest. I both got to the reloads quicker and reloaded quicker. Some of the last I suspect was because I am more or less IPSC trained, so you let the mag drop clear while you reload the new mag. I could have been quicker, but no one else was close. AND I don't think anyone else let their mags drop. You shoot how your practice.

    I had some difficulty keeping both eyes open. I have spent SO many years closing one eye to shoot that it just comes second nature. In the last segment I purposefully kept both eyes open when shooting. Don't know if that made the hits better, but it was different.

    I have a tendency to let the second shot go when the front sight is SOMEWHERE on the target. I don't actually line up the front/rears. It probably is the cause for the shots being off.

    It is HARD to shoot FAST. I remember that from IPSC, but the lesson came back last night. One can shoot at a comfortable rate, but often (at least in my case) it isn't really FAST. I note that when I try to go fast I usually get worse. But in truth I don't know of another way to get quicker. Doug Koernig once said one should just shoot fast - and the accuracy would come. I am not really convinced.

    But what came out last night was that you shoot the way you are used to shooting. I know the self-defense gang keep saying this, but one needs to SEE it to recognize just how true that is.

    So since we all carry, perhaps we all need to spend real time just double tapping. Doesn't matter where the hit is, just get the rounds off. THEN work on better hits.

    ?Thought.
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    Tennessee Jed
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    Re: Practice

    Post by Tennessee Jed on Fri Dec 04, 2015 6:40 pm

    I've been working on something similar. For the longest time, I spent a lot of time on accuracy. My goal was to regularly fire 10 shots into a 3 inch circle at 13 yards, with no thought about time.

    I've changed this practice to pick up speed, and it is difficult. I talked with some shooters I respect, and they all said that to increase speed but retain accuracy, start shooting more quickly. When your shots begin to fall outside the target, that is your starting point. At that starting point, start practicing until all the shots go inside the target at the same rate of speed. At that point, it's time to pick up speed and/or reduce the size of the target.

    I started with 8 inch circles. Moved down to 6 inch squares. Next weekend I'll be trying 4 inch squares. What I've learned is I shoot more accurately at speed if: (1) I use more finger on the trigger, (2) I keep both eyes open, (3) I learn what is an acceptable sight picture (versus a perfect sight picture).

    Don't know if this would work for others, but I think it's working for me. I really should get a timer to measure the speed, but I've been using counting as a cadence to measure. At first it was seconds (saying to myself "one-one-thousand, two-one-thousand"). Now I'm running at half-seconds (saying to myself "One-and-two-and-three-and-four"). In each case, firing when I hit the number.

    Later I want to get more speed by portions of seconds (saying quickly "one-two-three-four").

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    Devereaux
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    Re: Practice

    Post by Devereaux on Sat Dec 05, 2015 9:52 pm

    Interesting approach. I truly don't know what works best. I keep trying to lock by off-hand wrist to decrease the recoil of the weapon. It only works a bit for me. Perhaps I am not locking it correctly, although I think I understand the anatomic theory.

    I keep watching videos of guys blazing away at what I would say is outrageous speed. I am just not sure how one gets to that condition. Maybe your way, Tj, is how to go about it.

    One other thing. I am becoming convinced that width of rear sight opening is also important. I recollect shooting buckhorn sights on Winchesters, and you could just fly! Most cowboy shooters recognize this. I am not totally sure just how I shoot the rifle in those stages, but I DO know it's a lot faster than I shoot my handguns, even working the lever.
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    Tennessee Jed
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    Re: Practice

    Post by Tennessee Jed on Mon Dec 07, 2015 12:11 pm

    Yeah, I think a wider rear sight makes a difference. I installed some Dawson Precision sights on my Glocks, which have a wider notch, and I installed more narrow front sights. It allows me to see daylight on both sides of the front sight when aligned and they are MUCH quicker than the factory glock sights.

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